TeamViewer Confirms That “Significant” Amount of User Accounts Were Breached

I posted last week that there was a suspected breach with TeamViewer. They have confirmed it. Please see the ArsTechnica article below, however they are still blaming the users.



On Sunday, TeamViewer spokesman Axel Schmidt acknowledged to Ars that the number of takeovers was “significant,” but he continued to maintain that the compromises are the result of user passwords that were compromised through a cluster of recently exposed megabreaches involving more than 642 million passwords belonging to users of LinkedIn, MySpace, and other services.



Beware of off brand cameras – Even from Amazon – Cameras found with embedded malware

I came across this when going through my feed today and wanted to share this with you all. I myself have purchased a few off brand cameras and have had good luck with them but now I am going to be MUCH more careful when getting them in the future, as well as taking a closer look at the ones I have in my network already. Read the below quote and links from
Be careful while buying any off-brand electronics from Amazon, as they could end up infecting you.
Recently, independent security researcher Mike Olsen discovered that the CCTV surveillance devices sold on Amazon came with pre-installed malware.
Olsen discovered this nasty secret after he bought a set of outdoor CCTV surveillance cameras from Amazon for one of his friends.
He picked Sony Chip HD 6 Camera 1080P PoE IP CCTV surveillance camera kit sold by the Urban Security Group (USG) on Amazon, as it had good reviews and was a relatively cheap set of 6 cameras with all necessary equipment included.
While helping his friend set up the cameras, Olsen logged into the administrator panel to configure the surveillance system and found that the page hosted “no normal controls or settings.”
Assuming that it might be bad programming, Olsen opened up the browser’s developer tools and was surprised to discover a hidden iFrame loaded at the bottom of the body tag, retrieving content from

Surveillance Camera Comes Pre-Installed with Malware

A quick Google search revealed that the domain was used in malware distribution campaigns, according to a blog post by cyber-security vendor Sucuri in 2011.


In short, this means that the newly bought surveillance camera kit could be infected with malware anytime, when the operator decides to push malicious code to the DVR’s backend through the hidden iFrame.


Once the CCTV camera’s operator accessed that page, the malware would be downloaded and installed, potentially leading to unlawful spying and data theft.


Since the domain was already on the firmware, there might be other nasty malware included in the firmware as well, that does not provide the camera’s owner to access the backend.


The malware distributed by the surveillance cameras can have the ability to hijack video feeds or make the customer’s cameras part of a DDoS Botnet, something that happened last year.


So be careful what you buy. Check reviews of every product before buying, even if the product brand and the eCommerce platform is trusted.